Strange Map of the Day

Re: Strange Map of the Day

Postby Windwalker » Jan 07, 2018 4:01 pm

Image

Someone mapped out where they think the "underground military tunnels" are based on where kids have gone missing at National Parks... lols (at the tunnels idea not at real missing kids).
User avatar
Windwalker
Supporter
 
Posts: 2805
Joined: Dec 09, 2006 2:42 am
Location: Oregon

Re: Strange Map of the Day

Postby Americalex » Jan 07, 2018 4:13 pm

So the underground network is controlled by democrats? :D
User avatar
Americalex
Supporter
 
Posts: 20116
Joined: Aug 27, 2004 2:48 am
Location: Quebec

Re: Strange Map of the Day

Postby Windwalker » Jan 08, 2018 3:02 am

Americalex wrote:So the underground network is controlled by democrats? :D


LOL ya I saw that too. Ironically, the map's creator probably votes Democrat.
User avatar
Windwalker
Supporter
 
Posts: 2805
Joined: Dec 09, 2006 2:42 am
Location: Oregon

Re: Strange Map of the Day

Postby Windwalker » Jan 08, 2018 3:07 am

Image
User avatar
Windwalker
Supporter
 
Posts: 2805
Joined: Dec 09, 2006 2:42 am
Location: Oregon

Re: Strange Map of the Day

Postby Bayowolf » Jan 08, 2018 12:06 pm

I'm not sure that the Brits had the stomach to go to war with the Union--especially with their people being largely against slavery. In our timeline, by 1863, the Union was the 2nd largest industrial power (#1 in gun manufacturing) on its way to totally dwarfing the UK by 1900. (In 1901, the United States Steel Corporation swallowed up a smaller competitor. This competitor--The Carnegie Steel Company--was producing more than the United Kingdom was at the time.

EDIT: This was in response to Windwalker's Turtledovish map on the previous page. As I submitted my post 10 minutes ago, I was surprised that there apparently was a whole 'nother conversation about military tunnels. BTW: The tunnels as shown on the first map come to nowhere near San Diego (a naval base about which you've surely heard) and Luke AFB (Glendale, AZ) which is the largest fighter-pilot-training facility in the Free World)
"The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those who speak it."
~~George Orwell

"[A] nation that is afraid to let its people judge the truth and falsehood in an open market is a nation that is afraid of its people."
~~John Fitzgerald Kennedy
User avatar
Bayowolf
Supporter
 
Posts: 1626
Joined: Jun 10, 2008 1:24 pm
Location: Arizona

Re: Strange Map of the Day

Postby Windwalker » Jan 08, 2018 1:42 pm

I'm not sure that the Brits had the stomach to go to war with the Union--especially with their people being largely against slavery. In our timeline, by 1863, the Union was the 2nd largest industrial power (#1 in gun manufacturing) on its way to totally dwarfing the UK by 1900. (In 1901, the United States Steel Corporation swallowed up a smaller competitor. This competitor--The Carnegie Steel Company--was producing more than the United Kingdom was at the time.


There was a very vocal (and strong) minority of hawkish types in Parliament at the time. The anti-slavery call was very powerful in England and other parts of the UK, but Brits were turned-off by Lincoln's overtures to the Slave States in the early months of the war to try and get them to stay in the Union early on.

The bottom line was, the Bank of England and the British Empire (in general) both stood in a position where greater military posture and a stronger economy would have resulted (for them) if the Confederacy had won its independence. Fire-bombing New York and Boston whilst invading Maine (in the North) while simultaneously selling equipment to the South that would open up commerce with Europe would have easily sealed the deal in short order, with minimal risk or loss to British military hardware.... The Tzar's motives were likely more self-interested than a show of solidarity with the US. Russia was on the verge of war with England and France, anyway, over Poland, and having the Russian Fleet stationed in San Fran and New York prevented the more powerful Allied fleets from bottling them up in the Russian ports with limited access... Just too many variables for the quick "shock and awe" style plan the English hawks had in mind, combined with the US winning two major land battles in the same period of the conflict...

WW1 really did almost happen at that point, though. The Confederacy was chomping at the bit to break the blockade, their raw materials rolling into European factories would have all but guaranteed the Confederacy's survival, regardless of how many guns and how much grain the US was producing at the time.
User avatar
Windwalker
Supporter
 
Posts: 2805
Joined: Dec 09, 2006 2:42 am
Location: Oregon

Re: Strange Map of the Day

Postby Windwalker » Jan 10, 2018 12:05 pm

Image
User avatar
Windwalker
Supporter
 
Posts: 2805
Joined: Dec 09, 2006 2:42 am
Location: Oregon

Re: Strange Map of the Day

Postby Fat Tony » Jan 10, 2018 5:39 pm

the end of the Circassians

This ramped up around 1864. Tolstoy wrote a book about what he saw during the Imperial Russian campaign in that region. Well he served in that campaign. One for the reading list.

Image

Ethnic cleansing the ever popular easy button.
eh
User avatar
Fat Tony
Supporter
 
Posts: 2420
Joined: Apr 17, 2004 10:39 am
Location: Nova-Scotia

Previous

Return to Interests

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest
cron